$96 Billion Spent on Infrastructure in Canada, Infrastructure Projects Map built from open data

$96 Billion Spent on Infrastructure in Canada – ReNew Canada’s Top 100 Biggest Infrastructure Projects shows trend towards: Hydroelectric and Transportation Projects Top 100 on news stands now.

What’s significant about this application is that it shows how geography, GIS and open data can be used to visualize and better explain community concerns (e.g. how stimulus funding for infrastructure projects was spread across the country).

The site uses ESRI’s ArcGIS API for Flex, a free map viewer based on the Adobe Flex framework. It displays geographic data on a free community basemap on ArcGIS Online, a platform hosted by ESRI where users can access high-quality, ready-to-use basemaps and build GIS applications. The community map is compiled from authoritative content from national mapping organizations and governments worldwide including NRCan and several Canadian municipalities (Toronto, Nanaimo, Kamloops, Moncton and others),  which contributed their data through the ESRI Canada Community Maps Program. The application is an excellent example of innovation resulting from open data.

 

Canadian infrastructure spending is alive and well, with $96,096,400,000 being spent in 20 categories according to ReNew Canada – the country’s leading expert on infrastructure, which today published its Top 100 Projects 2011 Report. 

"Infrastructure is a leading indicator of economic growth, and this country is doing well in terms of large-scale projects," said Mira Shenker, Editor, ReNew Canada. "For 4 years, the Top 100 has been a barometre for spending and this year, the projects total over $96 billion, up from $68 billion in 2010. While 46% of all buildings on the list are new builds, the rest are renewals and expansions, an indication that a fair amount is being done to address this country’s aging assets."

In this year’s Top 10, representing over a third of spending on the list, some $36 billion was spent, primarily on Transportation/Transit (5 projects) and Hydroelectric/Renewable Energy (4 projects), with one hospital expansion.

"This year, we saw an increase in the number of projects involving transit and transportation, with 34 commuter projects to highways and bridges – likely an indication that government is actively looking to fix existing infrastructure and come to terms with rapid expansion," said Shenker.

Two of the Top 10 projects are in Toronto – Eglinton Crosstown LRT Project ($4.6 billion) and the Spadina Subway Extension ($2.63 billion).Their presence on any future list may be under review given current discussions around Transit City’s status.

The top ten projects are:

1) Romaine Complex A Renewable Energy Project, Quebec $6.5 billion (No. 1 in 2010)

2) Lower Churchill Hydro Project, Central Labrador $6.2 billion (New)

3) Eastmain-1-A/Sarcelle/ Rupert Project, Quebec $5 billion (No. 2 in 2010)

4) Eglinton Crosstown, LRT, Ontario $4.6 billion (New)

5) Turcot Interchange, Quebec $3 billion (No. 10 in 2010)

6) Spadina Subway extension, Ontario $2.63 billion (No. 3 in 2010)

7) Lower Mattagami Hydroelectric Complex, Ontario $2.6 billion (New)

8) CHUM (Centre hospitaller de l’Universite de Montreal) Redevelopment, Quebec $2.5 billion (New)

9) Port Mann/Highway 1 Project, British Columbia $2.46 billion

10) Ottawa LRT, Ontario $2.1 billion (New)

For the full list of key players and details such as financing sources, visit top100projects.ca. Find an interactive map of all projects at http://top100projects.ca

Canada’s infrastructure renewal magazine, ReNew Canada, began publication in October 2005 as a business magazine that profiles the design, construction, financing models, management methods, and leading-edge technologies behind Canada’s infrastructure industry. To learn more visit renewcanada.net

Suggested Reading – Getting to Know ArcGIS for Desktop
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Editor (18230 Posts)

Glenn is a geographer and a GIS professional with over 20 years experience in the industry. He's the co-founder of GISuser and several other technology web publications.


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